F. Scott Fitzergald’s Gatsby Girls

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She was an impulsive, fashionable and carefree 1920s woman who embodied the essence of the Gatsby Girl — F. Scott Fitzgerald’s wife, Zelda. As Fitzgerald said, “I married the heroine of my stories.” All of the eight short stories contained in this collection were inspired by Zelda. Fitzgerald, one of the foremost writers of American fiction, found early success as a short story writer for the most widely read magazine of the early 20th century — the Saturday Evening Post. Fitzgerald’s stories, first published by the Post between 1920 and 1922, brought the Jazz Age and the “flapper” to life. Read More

 

Reviews

 

From Midwest Book Review: A prized addition for academic and community library American Literature Studies collections, “F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Gatsby Girls” is very highly recommended reading and will well serve to introduce a new generation of readers to the literary talents of F. Scott Fitzgerald. Read More

News

Scott and Zelda: A Marriage on Fire

By Ron Hogan
F. Scott Fitzgerald met Zelda Sayre while he was stationed in Alabama, serving in the United States Army during the First World War—just as Jay Gatsby first meets Daisy in the backstory to The Great Gatsby. In the novel, Gatsby loses Daisy to Tom Buchanan for a while, but unlike Gatsby, Fitzgerald was able to marry his love… two weeks after Scribner agreed to publish his first novel, This Side of Paradise, which finally convinced the 20-year-old debutante of his ability to provide for her. Read More


  • F. Scott Fitzgerald and His Gatsby Girls

    By Jeff Nilsson, Saturday Evening Post Historian

    By the time he published The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald was already one of the best-known authors in America.  His fame had begun years earlier with the bestselling novel, This Side of Paradise, which sold out in 24 hours and went through 12 reprintings. Read More

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